This was posted on the website of the Archdiocese of Saint Paul and Minneapolis earlier today:

Rev. Paul Moudry has resigned as pastor of the Church of Saint Margaret Mary in Golden Valley. Rev. Moudry has been on a voluntary leave of absence from priestly ministry since November 2013. Over the past year, Rev. Moudry has cooperated with the Archdiocese and the Ministerial Standards Board in a comprehensive review of prior misconduct (with adults in non-illegal activities) from many years ago.

Archbishop John Nienstedt accepted Rev. Moudry’s offer to resign as pastor of Saint Margaret Mary.  Rev. Moudry will continue his voluntary leave of absence and has participated in making appropriate disclosure to his parishioners and trustees.



No additional information has been provided. When Father Moudry's leave was announced in November of 2013 it was stated that he would not engage in any public ministry while on leave. It is unclear whether this agreement remains in place, and it is also unclear how the Archdiocese will provide for his ongoing support.


The other priest who took voluntary leave at the same time as Father Moudry, Father David Barrett, was returned to ministry in 2014 after a very strange and limited disclosure to his parish. I am not sure to which parishioners and trustees Father Moudry has made disclosures given that the announcement states he has resigned his pastorate.
 


Comments

Lee
01/21/2015 1:21am

Thank you for your many informative postings. Oh, what a tangled web indeed! Father Moudry is one of many priests now "on dry dock". Lay workers have and will be laid off. Will there be any consequences for the priests who are not fit to serve actively?

Dave
01/21/2015 9:32am

I think it is important that we forgive those who are truly sorry, first and foremost. But then what to do with Father Moudry? He is a priest, having received Holy Orders and a permanent seal on his soul. But he cannot be a pastor. The answer? In an age where the local Church does not have the funds to pay lay employees to do certain administrative functions that do not involve contact with people, why not have this priest do them? He can be paid far less, if anything at all, provided he is given room and board in a rectory or somewhere else. Its not right to just toss him out into the street like garbage. If he is sorry and seeks to amend his ways, why not put him to work and save money by doing so? It gives him something to do, as work is dignified, and prevents more harm from being done. It also helps us keep track of a man who needs supervision and keeps him busy (idle hands...etc.). We have saints who were porters, for crying out loud. We can have non-pastor priests making copies and filing.

Tom
01/21/2015 5:27pm

Fr Moudry did not disclose to the parishioners what he did. It was all handled very poorly, and once again the archdiocese is refusing to be transparent. Does anyone know what he did? Was it with a man or woman? He told us during Mass he will not be ashamed..such pride..maybe he needs to be ashamed. Because of him our church will probably close.

Kathleen Burke-Scheffler
01/23/2015 1:16pm

We joined St. Margaret Mary parish because of Father Paul Moudry's pastoral leadership. His homilies nurtured us far more than the majority of homilies we hear from Catholic pulpits. We joined the parish after visiting numerous parishes in an effort to find one that actively lived out Catholic social teaching and did not just adhere to the "party line". We left our previous parish due to the heavy handed implications of how parishioners should vote in the 2012 elections. During that election campaign period, Father Moudry acknowledged differing perspectives and encouraged open mindedness. We appreciated that. All of the parishioners with whom I have spoken, are heartsick that he will not be returning. We held out hope for 15 months that all would be well and he would return. His gifts are many and we wish him the very best in what comes next for his ministry. We will miss him a great deal.


Comments are closed.

    Author

    Jennifer Haselberger is a canon lawyer who served as the Chancellor for Canonical Affairs in the Archdiocese of Saint Paul and Minneapolis until April of 2013, when she resigned in protest of the Archdiocese's handling of sexual misconduct by clergy.

    To receive notice when a new post is added, follow @jmhaselberger.

    Archives

    February 2015
    January 2015
    December 2014
    November 2014
    October 2014